Junior Spartan Race

JuniorSR

 

 

I am an obstacle course racer and I have been participating in Spartan Races for three years now. I’ve watched the Spartan Race community grow and have witnessed people of all ages and ability complete, for some of them, their hardest challenge yet. It’s amazing to meet everyone and witness their accomplishments.

I’ve also watched the emergence of the Junior Spartan Race. A lot of people still don’t know about the existence of the Junior Races. Obstacle racing has only begun gaining popularity in Eastern Canada within the last two years and most races are incorporating kids races as well. Instead of looking for a babysitter, why not bring your kids to the race as well. I remember when I was a kid, I loved playing on the monkey bars and jungle gym during recess and lunch. Perhaps, that is why I love doing obstacle races – it allows me to be a kid again. Seeing the expression of the kids when they cross the finish line and receive their medal is so rewarding. All of them are in smiles for the rest of the day. I’ve always congratulated the kids when I see them walking around with their medals and you can tell they are genuinely excited.

Today, I am happy to announce that I am a member of the Junior Spartan Race Street Team. What does that mean? It means that I am provided with posters and flyers as well as a discount promo code to promote the Junior Spartan Race in Eastern Canada. Spartan Race is hoping to significantly expand awareness and sign-ups for the JSR in the 2015 season. Distances range from 0.75km to 2.5km and from ages 4 to 13.

Contact me at: linda.nguyenm@gmail.com for the promo code! :)

2015 Junior Race season begings May 23, 2015. Junior events will be held in conjunction with Spartan Sprints in Montreal, Halifax, Quebec City, Ottawa and Toronto. Look forward to seeing you and your kiddies at a Spartan Race in 2015! AROO!

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Annual Holiday Toy Collection

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Season’s Greetings! It’s the most wonderful time of the year!
The holidays are here, so time to spread a little holiday cheer. :)
Since 2011 I have been collecting toys from my colleagues and friends during holiday parties. The toys would then be delivered to The Hospital for Sick Children in time for all the lovely kids to enjoy.
This holiday, I am hoping to expand my collection and have partnered up with the Children’s Aid Foundation for their Fill the Sleigh campaign. Children’s Aid Foundation, together with local child welfare agencies across the GTA will provide holiday gifts to children and youth interacting with the child welfare system. I have been blessed to volunteer with CAF during their many events and especially at their Annual Holiday Season Celebration; where I have witnessed firsthand the happiness, joy and excitement of receiving and opening gifts during the holidays. For many of them, it may be the only gifts they receive and the only holiday celebration they may experience.
If you would like to participate and help spread some holiday cheer, you can do so by donating new unwrapped toys or other essentials, please let me know and I will be more than happy to pick them up from you. Don’t like holiday shopping or pressed for time? You can make a cash donation through the Children’s Aid Foundation website or through me and I will be glad to purchase toys on your behalf. Your donation will go towards brightening the lives of those who need it most this holiday season.
I will be delivering the toys to the CAF office on Thursday, December 18th.
For more information on the Fill the Sleigh campaign, please visit: http://www.cafdn.org/fillthesleigh/
Thank You! Wishing everyone a Happy Holidays! <3
Xo.
LN
My first holiday toy collection in 2011
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Happy Anniversary To My Tribe

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My first run coming back from a shoulder injury and without a sling, happened to fall on the Tribe Fitness 1 year anniversary run. I plan to take the rest of the year off to recover and start running and training again in January but for my Tribe, I made an exception. :)

I’ve been running with Tribe for almost a year now. It is the first running group that I joined; other than the paid half marathon clinic program that I did with the Running Room. From my first run with Tribe to 1 year later; I have grown both as a runner and a person. I’ve had the wonderful opportunity to meet some amazing runners and athletes from beginners to elites and of all different backgrounds. I have formed close friendships with some of the Tribe and am grateful they are now my #TribeBrothers and #TribeSisters; my #TribeFamily. I’ve learned a lot from the Tribe members and continually do so. The biggest thing I learned was how to run in polar vortex conditions. This was my first year running throughout the winter and I enjoyed it. I hate to admit it, but I am kinda looking forward to running in the winter again.

I trained for my longest race to date: Around The Bay 30k this past March. I am thankful to have found a group of dedicated runners who were also training for ATB and thus helped pushed me to finish that race. It was hard getting up early on a Saturday in the winter when it was still dark out and taking the subway downtown to the Tribe meet up spot. Some days there were only a handful of us, or the weather would be brutally cold; but we showed up and knocked those kilometer’s out. Every Saturday, I knew there would be a group of runners waiting to do a long run, whether I showed up or not. But I knew that to be a better runner, you just have to run more. I am so thankful I did. To that group of runners that motivated me to get out of bed on Saturday mornings, I sincerely thank you!

Thanks to my Tribe, I have grown to become a better and more dedicated runner. I discovered that I’m a winter warrior and really enjoy winter running, I actually prefer it over humid summers any day. I’ve also grown as a person and discovered a new found passion, [although some of my friends might call it obsession ;) ] with running. This year I also participated in the most road races ever. Good thing I had my Tribe along for all of those races, both running or cheering me on.

I am proud to be a member of Tribe Fitness, but I am more proud of the Tribe’s accomplishment. I’ve witnessed new runners completing their longest distance races ever to runners transitioning to and completing Triathlons and Ironmans. Not only am I proud of my Tribe’s accomplishments, but also motivated and inspired to grow and seek new challenges for myself. Who knows, maybe I will want to be an ultra runner or Traithlete as well. Over the year, I’ve learned that whatever goals or challenges I set for myself, I will always have a fabulous group of athletes there to support me, challenge me, motivate me and encourage me. To my Tribe and of course, our fearless leader Heather, I thank you! You will always have a special place in my heart. <3

TribeClanPlenty of run memories were created this year! Let’s take a trip down memory lane with some of my favourite moments with the Tribe. It’s hard to believe it’s only been a year. There are so many photos, you can check out Tribe Fitness on Facebook for more.

My first run with Tribe

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What polar vortex..!? We even train hills in the winter and the last picture in this group is quite possibly the coldest day of the year in 2014!

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Tribe Ugly Sweater Run

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Around the Bay simulation run and shake out / race kit pick up run

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Jenna and I had a goal for 2014, but due to our injuries, is pushed to 2015. We will crush it!

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Spot the Olympian! ;)

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Warmer weather is among us

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The time we crashed Twitter with our famous ‘Ellen’ selfie

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My birthday run! <3

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The time a running magazine featured our picture from the Mississauga Marathon

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The time we decided to wear our new compression socks during a Saturday long run

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The time we decided to dress all in white and get colour bombs thrown at us

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Tribe Does Trail

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Tribe Scavenger Run

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The time we volunteered as pace monsters for the Ivivva kids 3k Monster Mash Dash

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What better way to celebrate 1 year of sweating for social good, than to have a run party and run around downtown Toronto to various checkpoints answering Tribe related trivia

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Can you see our Tribe shirts?

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Thanks to Vega Toronto and Oakley Canada for supporting Tribe at the RUNiversary and year roundtribeanniversary

Last but not least, check out the amazing statistics Tribe racked up in just 1 year! Thank You Tribe Fitness! We love you and proud to watch you continuously grow.

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Enbridge CN Tower Climb for United Way

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This was my 8th year participating in the Enbridge CN Tower Climb for United Way. Every year I create a team and climb on the Corporate Challenge Day Sunday. I encourage my friends and coworkers to join and I enjoy seeing and hearing about everyone’s experience, especially the first time climbers. Due to the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon being on the same day as the Sunday Corporate climb, I changed our team climb date to Thursday. I had a team of five, and three were first time climbers.

Registration: There is no fee to register for the climb, however you had to raise a minimum of $100 for the United Way Committee. The deadline to raise the minimum was two weeks before the climb (as per email communications from United Way), but they allow you to raise funds up until the climb date.

Expo: N/A

Registration Kit: Being a part of a team, the team captain had to pick up the wristbands and chip card for the rest of the team. The CN Tower is still open to the public during the climb, therefore the wristband allows the climbers access to enter the CN Tower.

Parking: There is paid underground parking at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre or along the city streets. Public transportation would be the easiest so you don’t have to deal with looking and paying for parking. I took the subway to Union Station and walked to the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

Pre-Climb: Sign in and registration was at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. There was a free coat and bag check for your belongings. The CN Tower Climb is a hands free climb, therefore no purses, water bottles or electronic devices (phones, iPod’s, etc.) are allowed in the stairwell. Before the climb, there was an area for a warm-up as well as water and KIND snack bars were being handed out. There were tents for the various Financial Institutions and Corporations to meet up and hang out before and after the climb. Since Enbridge was a major sponsor, they had their own coat check and booth too. There was a massage area where climbers can get a massage pre or post climb. The centre area of the Convention hall was a table where you can check your time and pick up your finisher t-shirt and volunteers will write your climb time on it.

CN Tower Climb: The climb started at 7:00 pm and there was a lineup of anxious climbers. Climbers leave the Metro Toronto Convention Centre and walk through the back corridor to the CN Tower. Once you arrive at the base of the Tower, there is a lineup for security check. Security guards will search all climbers and ensure there are no bags or electronic devices and that all climbers have a wristband. After the first security check, you enter into the Tower and head to the second security check point. The second checkpoint has three machines known as a “Puffer Machine”. A puffer machine is a security device that seeks to detect explosives and illegal drugs at airports and other sensitive facilities; as per Wiki.

Once all the security check stations were completed, volunteers directed you to the stairwell where there was a table to scan your chip card before the climb. The CN Tower Climb consists of 1,776 steps or 145 floors. The stairwell is just big enough for two people, therefore slower climbers stick to the right and faster climbers pass on the left. There are Paramedics at every few floors to keep an eye on the climbers. I’ve seen the Medics give out juice boxes to those requiring sugar. During one year of my climb, I witnessed a Medic take a climber to a small doorway on the right side of the wall (they had one every few floors) and from there, you can choose to quit climbing and take the elevator back down. So the question is Yes, you can quit and take the elevator back down if you can no longer continue climbing. Although I think the Medics try to help climbers as much as possible by letting them rest and providing sugar if needed before they take you to the escape route.

Once you get to the top, climbers than scan their chip card again to stop their time. A good thing to know is that once you scan your chip card, there are about 4-5 more floors you have to climb to actually get to the Observation Deck area of the CN Tower. Climbers can go outside and stand on the Observation Deck and take in the view of the city. I have always climbed on a Sunday, so this was my first time climbing in the evening. The view of the city is breathtaking from the CN Tower at night. I wish I had a camera or phone to capture it. That’s the only bad part of the climb – the hands free.

Water/Aid Stations: There are no water stations along the climb but there are Paramedics every few floors. Water is provided before and as soon as you get to the top.

Volunteers: This event is always fully staffed with volunteers. There are lots of volunteers from when you first enter the Metro Toronto Convention Centre guiding you where to go, there were volunteers at the registration, bag check, along the corridor to the CN Tower cheering everyone on, at the base of the Tower and at the top of the Tower both cheering and providing water. There was also a big group of volunteers at the t-shirt pick up area handing out shirts and writing the times on them.

Spectators: Security issues and overcrowding in stairwells prevent spectators from spectating during the climb, but there are lots of seats at the cafe and general store area of the CN Tower to wait for the climbers.

Post-Climb: Once you get to the top of the Tower, you can go outside to the Observation Deck and hang out a bit or wait inside. There is a always a lineup to get back down via the elevators. Climbers make their way back to the Metro Toronto Convention Centre where you can check your time and receive a t-shirt with your finishing time on the back.

The CN Tower Climb has come a long way since when I first started climbing back in 2007. There were no chip cards and climbers were given a paper card that you had to get the time stamped at the beginning of the climb and then stamped again at the end of the climb. Holding onto the card during the climb makes for a sweaty card after. This card would then be given to the volunteer who would then manually calculate your climb time and record it on your t-shirt. I love the new process with the chip card and just having to scan it at the beginning and end. This also helps because your results are published right away from Chip Time Results, so you can view it on the screen after you scan your card. The time is then written down by a volunteer and you would hand in the card to another volunteer who would record it on the back of your finisher t-shirt. The only  recommendation I would make is instead of holding onto a chip card the whole climb, perhaps have the chip on the wristband as well or even have a similar process to road races and have a chip that can be attached to your shoe and a timing mat to record your start and finish time when you step over it.

*I think there may have been one year that the timing chip was a separate wristband, but I can’t be positive. If it was, I’m not sure why the process was switched from it. I vaguely remember scanning my wrist at the end of the climb.*

Would I Climb It Again: Yes! I love the CN Tower Climb and enjoy it every  year. I enjoy getting a team of both colleagues and friends to participate. I just wish that the date would change and that it would not always be on the same weekend as the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. It’s kinda hard to run a marathon after climbing 1,776 flights of stairs. I managed to do both this year only because I did the half marathon instead.

BRAG: I did the climb with a dislocated shoulder and had my sling on!! It wasn’t my fastest climb time (PB 19:12), but I think it’s still a pretty good time and within my goal of 30 minutes! :)

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Setbacks Are An Opportunity For A Killer Comeback

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Two weeks ago, I ran my umpteenth obstacle course race this season. I’ve completed about 12 Spartan Races and a Tough Mudder this summer, and those were considered to be the ‘harder’ obstacle races.

It was raining the day of the Badassh Dash in Kitchener and I was running in the Elite heat. The Elite heat was a bit longer than the regular scheduled 7km course and had different options (which are harder) at the obstacles for the Elites. It was raining that morning so it made everything slippery and some obstacles harder than they actually were. As I was climbing up the slippery wall using the rope, I let go of my left hand to grab the top of the wall and then my right hand grabbed the top. As I tried to hoist myself up and over the wall, my foot slipped and I jerked back while still holding on the the top with both hands. At this point I heard a popping sound in my right and knew then and there, that my shoulder had popped. I’ve never dislocated a shoulder before but the popping sound and minor pain made me very aware that it was dislocated. I hung there for a bit not knowing if I should go back down or climb over the wall to the other side and use the rope to get down. I ended up pushing myself over the wall and once I grabbed the rope on the other side, I asked a Medic if he could help  me down because I popped my shoulder. As he put his hands on the base of my feet and lowered me down, I was still holding on to the rope. My arms were extended and I heard another popping sound. This time, it felt like my shoulder popped back in. As I stood on the ground, the Medic asked if my breathing and heart rate was okay. Then he made me raise my hands over my head and squeeze his hand to make sure I was fine. I felt fine and he said it was my decision if I wanted to continue or not. So of course, I decided to continue the race.

I was cautious and was running with my left hand holding onto my shoulder. About 20 minutes after, I got to another climbing obstacle and I  slowly started climbing over the wooden bars and heard another popping sound. I knew this time I had to stop. I tried to climb over the wall and the pain was getting stronger as I was making my way down. I was weak in my right hand and could barely grip the bars anymore that I had to jump down. The volunteer asked if I needed a Medic and I said yes. When the Medic got there, I was hoping they would be able to pop it back in and that I could finish the race. Not the case. :( He said he had to take me back down to the Medic tent and get it looked at there. I asked how far I was in the race and the volunteer said more than half way. I asked if I was able to run it and the Medic said no and that it may get worse. Being an athlete and having participated in numerous obstacle course races for the past two years, my pain threshold was pretty high. I’m used to pushing through the pain, the unpredictable weather, the difficulty of obstacles; but having an injury was too serious and as much as I wanted to finish the race and earn that medal, I knew I had to be smart and called it quits. It was my FIRST DNF ever.

As I was being takePhoto Collage Maker_EJ4YR1n down on the ATV, all I could think about was that I didn’t finish the race. I was sad and disappointed in myself. When I found out that I had to immobilize my right shoulder for four weeks, I was totally bummed. I was sad I would no longer be able to compete in the Spartan Race World Championships in Killington, Vermont the week after with athletes from all over the world. That was the race I had been training for. To compete in the hardest obstacle race terrain of all obstacle races. It was the ultimate challenge and I thought I was ready to tackle it. I had also been training for my first marathon and felt good that my training was on track. Now not being able to run for four weeks and my next check up at the hospital being four days before the marathon, I was at a loss of what to do.

Everything happens for a reason. At least I hope they do. Perhaps I was not ready for the World Championships and that I would have gotten injured in Vermont. It’s probably better to get injured on home soil with health care then in another country. At least that’s what I keep telling myself. There is a reason I needed this four week break. I am not able to drive, go to work (I’m right hand dominant), and can not run or even walk with some pain in my shoulder. There is a reason for all of this. I just don’t know what it is yet.

With 19 days left until the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, it’s panic mode. I have not been running or doing anything active in the last two weeks. Even if I was not able to run the marathon, I still wanted to be able to walk it. I decided I needed to start taking action and do what I can with what I have. I decided to make the best out of my situation. I did my first workout in two weeks!

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I have not decided if I will still run the full marathon or walk it. If I will downgrade to a half marathon instead of the full. So many decisions to make and so little time remaining. I know this race will no longer be a goal time race for me. It will just be a goal of completion.

I cannot wait until my sling comes off and I can get back to running and training again. Being off for two weeks now, I was able to set some new goals and plan some of my races for 2015. I know I will be back better, faster, and stronger than I was before my injury. There is always room for improvement and I have lots to improve on. I will turn my setback into a killer comeback! :)

Training For My First Marathon: 6 Week Countdown

GetStronger

With the prospect of completing my first marathon looming around the corner;  I decided to write a weekly recap of my training and my road to STWM. Not for others to follow, but for myself. So that I can look back and see how far I’ve gotten, how much I’ve grown and how strong I’ve become, both as a runner and person.

Six weeks to go and I am getting excited and nervous. I’ve had so many positive encouragement and feedback ever since I wrote about my confessions of running my first marathon. From family to friends and other runners that I don’t know or will ever have the pleasure of knowing or meeting other than on social media. I just wanted to say THANK YOU! Thank you for taking the time to read my blog and thank you for following me along on this new quest of mine.

With a lot of hard work, commitment and dedication, I cannot wait to finally be able to change my title to MARATHONER.

Weekly Training Recap: Monday, September 1st – Sunday, September 7th, 2014. 

MoIMG_20140902_154217nday, September 1st

Thankfully it was a long weekend because I did not have time to do a long run on the weekend. I spent my Labour Day running the Culham Trail of Mississauga. It included hills, trails, gravel and some road. It was nice to explore new trails and push myself to achieve those extra kilometers in my training. I knew that if I did not run more than 30km, I would be behind in my training. This run was a difficult one. Especially since it was a sunny and humid day and running for a few hours in the heat was not how I would normally spend my holiday day off. I guess priorities change as my focus and goals change.

Tuesday, September 2nd

REST DAY (31km was the longest I’ve ever ran, so I figured I needed a rest day to recover)

Wednesday, September 3rd

Cross training and obstacle training day.IMG_20140903_214151

Not only am I training for my first marathon; but I am also training for the Spartan Race World Championship in Killington, Vermont on Saturday, September 20th! It will be my first time participating in a U.S. Spartan Race and it will be alongside some of the Elites from all over the world. I can’t wait!! More to come on the World Championship in a separate blog.

 I do my obstacle training at Alpha Obstacle Training in Toronto.

Thursday, September 4th

IMG_20140905_070502I run with the Night Terrors Run Crew (NTRC) on Thursdays for a #doubledigitsthursday long run. A few of us did a pre run before the official run with the rest of the crew. It was a special run as it was the Night Terrors Run Crew LA’s 1 year anniversary. We had a surprise route that mapped out the shape of the word LA. It was pretty neat. After the run, I ran a little over 2km back to the subway station to go home. Running a half marathon and then some on a weeknight feels amazing. I can already tell I’m becoming a stronger runner. Training for a half marathon before seemed really hard; now I am doing them on weeknights!

Friday, September 5th

REST DAY

Saturday, September 6th

IMG_20140906_162337Alpha Obstacle Training organizes an in house race once a month and Saturday was the Alpha OCR Series #7. I ran the race with my OCR team P4ID. It was a lot of fun and a good OCR fix since the Spartan Race Eastern Canada season ended in July. It’s not hilly compared to a Spartan Race, but it was a good challenge and my ideal way to spend a Saturday morning; climbing monkey bars, flipping over cargo nets, climbing ropes and walls, flipping tires and lots more fun obstacles.

Sunday, September 7th

I try to get one long run in on the weekend and it’s usually on Saturday with my Tribe Fitness; but when I have a race, I run on Sunday with NTRC. Our goal for Sunday was 36km. We ended up beasting 38km and it was my longest run ever! Since training for STWM, every week has been my longest run ever. We ran through trails, road and along the Lakeshore. It was an awesome route and a hot day. By the end of the run, I was feeling the humidity. We picked up the pace the last 2km because at that point, I just wanted the run to be over with. I was hot, tired and hungry. Surprisingly when the run was over, other than feeling hungry, tired and a little sore; my legs felt okay. I was not in pain like during the early days of my long runs and training. With every run, I get stronger. Both physically and mentally.

This week capped of my highest mileage week EVER for me! 105km in 6 days and I feel fantastic!! I won one of my Nike Running challenges of 100km in a month. I have been running over 100km every month since January 2014; but never would I imagine I would run over 100km in a week! This was definitely a milestone week for me. I don’t know if I can run over 100km in a week regularly, or even again; but I do know that I am becoming a stronger runner and that I am ready to crush my first full marathon! :)

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This was one of our picture points and our view on Sunday’s long run. Toronto! My city! What a beautiful view. :)

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Confessions Of A Soon-To-Be First Time Marathoner

DontQuit

So I am officially registered for my first full marathon this October! (See blog post here) 47 more days to go! I am feeling nervous, scared, anxious, and I just really want to get this first marathon jitters over with. 

As part of the Digital Champions duties for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, we are required to submit a blog post about our training or something that readers and fellow runners can relate to or feel inspired in preparation for the big day. There are a few inspiring pieces already submitted so I thought I would write about what my feelings and thoughts are about running my first full marathon. I know there are a bunch of first timers that will also be running at STWM so hopefully they can relate to my blog.

I’ve copied my blog post below and you can also find it here on the STWM Blog.

Confessions Of A Soon-To-Be First Time Marathoner. By Linda Nguyen

TORONTO August 31st 2014. Linda is an avid runner and obstacle course racer. After fracturing her right ankle pretty badly during an obstacle race in October 2012, and missing out on her first half-marathon opportunity at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, Linda started running again in February 2013. She crushed her 2013 fitness goals completing 12 road races and 5 obstacle races with some notable achievements including having completed her first half marathon, running 25k (her longest race), completing Tough Mudder in a snow and hail storm and becoming a member of the Spartan Race Trifecta Tribe. 2014 will be a big year for Linda as she will be running her first marathon at STWM on October 19th. Connect with Linda on Twitter @lindamnguyen and on her blog.

Confessions of a Soon-To-Be First Time Marathoner. By Linda Nguyen

Hi, my name is Linda and I am soon-to-be a Linda Warrior Dashfirst time marathoner. Is it too soon to call myself that? Maybe I am jinxing myself. What if all this training isn’t worth it and I don’t officially become a “first time marathoner”? What if I cramp up and have a repeat of my sad performance at last year’s STWM? Maybe I shouldn’t tell all my friends (and all of social media) that I am running the full marathon so that I don’t have to tell anyone how I did. All these thoughts are running through my head as I continue my training and quest for the title of “marathoner”.

There’s something about the word “marathoner” that makes you feel special and stand out from the crowd. It might not sound as elite as “Olympian” or “Professional Athlete” but I’m sure it does feel extraordinary nonetheless. Training to be a marathoner is not an easy task. It is a title that is earned and not given. Gone are those days of sleeping in and weekends of staying out late. I’ve had to decline invitations from friends if it conflicted with my training or race schedule. Yes, I know it sounds like an easy way out, but it’s true! I need to hold myself accountable and ensure I get my mileage in every week.

STWM is where I ran my first half marathon last year. So I am excited to return this year and try to complete the full marathon distance. That’s twice the distance and twice the training effort. I get nervous and nauseous just thinking about it. Now that we have approximately 8 weeks left before the big day, I find myself feeling panicking and pondering these important questions.

Pre-race panic:

What if I don’t get my mileage up enough?
What if I get injured?
How many days a week should I be training?
How much nutrition should I pack?
What will the weather be on race day?
What should I wear on race day?

During-race panic:

What if I get cramps?
Should I try to run it continuous or run 20 and 1’s?
Do I stop at all the water stations?
What if I don’t want to run the marathon anymore at the split mark?
What will happen if I just try to stick with the half marathoners at the split?

Post-race panic: 

Will my family and friends be there to watch me finish?
Where do I meet everyone?
What if I start bawling at the finish line?
How far is the medic area from the finish?
Should I get a massage?
WHERE DO I GO FOR BRUNCH?

So friends; if you are reading this, know that it’s not because I am avoiding you or that I don’t want to be with you, but because I am in training mode and I have a ton of questions I need answered on my path to STWM. Hopefully you won’t be upset, but will be able to support me as I cross that finish line and crush 42.2km on October 19th and can proudly change my title to MARATHONER!